This Week in Upgrades: February 20

Hey, hey! Mondays can be rough, so I hope you’re hanging in there today. If you’re feeling stressed out, you’re not alone. Americans just broke the American Psychological Association’s anxiety meter.There’s a lot of tension, confusion, and struggle all around. Let’s be patient and supportive with each other, yeah?

Were you braving nature’s fury this week? This is some insane wind in North Carolina. We got absolutely pummeled with rain here in California. Couldn’t do much else but stay at home and watch the new season of Chef’s Table (which I was OK with).

Here’s some more of the most interesting things I saw this week…

Trillions of clicks later, we’re thoroughly immersed in a culture of the Like button. It “did a lot of things it set out to do…and had a lot of unintended consequences.”

Did you see that #HurtBae video? Why do we get sucked into watching other people’s pain?

Already thinking about the weekend? Plan on shutting yourself in at home with a nice drink? There’s a word for that.

That’s just unfair.

Here’s the latest on universal basic income, which I’ve talked about previously. Seems to be gaining interest. We’ll see how things work out in Finland.

Los Angeles has so much light pollution that you can’t see many stars at night. But a 1994 power outage allowed them to shine through, and Angelenos basically thought the Milky Way was an alien invasion. How can we reclaim our connection to the night sky?

Keeping tabs on the sea ice: record lows at both poles. NBD.

Did you catch the premiere of Planet Earth IIOur planet is pretty awesome.

Here’s another reason to ditch fossil fuels: a study has linked prevalence of a type of leukemia with living near oil wells.

Asking the hard question to get important answers: Why do so many Americans fear Muslims?

It’s 75 years later, and we haven’t seemed to learn the lessons of the mass internment of Japanese Americans.

Neature: Yosemite’s firefall is blissful.

Hope you have a calm, rewarding week.

This Week in Upgrades: September 12

Monday, Monday. Let’s see what this week has in store. Hope you had a good weekend amidst the start of the NFL season, reflecting on 15 years after 9/11, and whatever else you may have been up to.

The past week was full of important happenings–and that’s in addition to the unfolding, depressing drama of the presidential election.

This was a fairly positive surprise: the Dakota Access Pipeline has been temporarily halted by the Department of Justice. “The recognition that the government may not have adequately taken tribes’ considerations into account is a significant achievement, but the decision by the Obama administration is far from definitive. In the meantime, the activists on the ground say they have no plans to move.” More work to do. Props to the activists.

This was not a good surprise: the most thorough study of ocean warming yet has some alarming findings. The oceans have been keeping the planet habitable, and they can’t take a whole lot more.

Tesla’s autopilot, “the best semi-autonomous system on the road today,” is upgrading in some crucial ways.

Yosemite National Park added 400 acres–the largest expansion there in 70 years. Wonderful!

Watch bacteria overcome antibiotics and turn into superbugs. Fascinating, yet terrifying.

Neuroscientists may have just identified the brain cells associated with schadenfreude. Why do we sometimes feel delight from other’s misfortune?

Babies are dumb so adults can be smarter.

Ever see floaters? A few visual disturbances are pretty common. Reassuring for my hypochondriac self.

A new drug has proven effective against one of the deadliest cancers without side effects. Immunotherapy findings like this are super promising.

Stay awesome.

 

This Week In Upgrades: May 9

Hello there! Happy Monday to you. I’m still wondering where the weekend went, but let’s make this week a good one.

This past week gave us a mixed bag. We found out Alaska is absurdly warmer than it should be. Alaska is a bellwether of climate change, and things like this are not good signs.

In less dire but still saddening news, we also found out that Disney plans to replace the Tower of Terror with a Guardians of the Galaxy ride. I loved Guardians of the Galaxy, but I’m not sure how I feel about this. Tower of Terror was my first true thrill ride as a kid. I suppose change is inevitable though–especially for theme parks trying to stay current.

In really encouraging things, there’s a movement now even among many doctors for a single-payer healthcare system. Pretty soon this is going to reach a tipping point–to the benefit of American doctors and patients alike.

Also very encouraging, this long-term study appears to show that there is no link between cell phones and brain cancer. I hope other studies confirm the same findings.

A review of clinical trials has demonstrated that acupuncture has real health benefits. Have you done it? I would really like to try it sometime.

To be sure, here’s an important reality-check on scientific studies in the media from Mr. John Oliver. Thank God for Last Week Tonight. Let’s all stay a little bit skeptical.

The ride-sharing app Lyft has found their vehicle, and apparently they’ll start launching their self-driving electric cars in 2017.

Google has also found their self-driving vehicle, but why did it have to be a minivan?

Did you grow up on Barbies or Transformers? Can we let toys be toys?

SpaceX has hired a renowned costume designer to make sure their suits are as badass as their mission programs.

Have a brilliant week! Whatever happens, try to focus on self-compassion instead of self-esteem.

 

This Week in Upgrades: Feb 15

Happy Monday, and a good Presidents Day to you! Are you off of work? I hope you enjoy it, if so. It may be the weirdest holiday, but it gives a lot of people a three-day weekend–so there’s that.

I’m turning 31 this week, which is difficult to believe. Honestly, the numbers stopped making sense around 25. When you’re old like me, you start to get a bit paranoid about anything out of the ordinary with your health. Fortunately, tips like these are a good way to combat the worry. I’m truly grateful to be alive, and I plan to be around for a long time.

It’s been an incredibly historic week. Gravitational waves, proposed by Einstein, were proven. This will begin an exciting new era of science–possibly even leading to time travel!

In other exciting science news, researchers are hailing unprecedented results in clinical trials using the body’s own t-cells for cancer treatment. If these initial findings are any indication, we’re at an important crossroad in outsmarting cancer.

By now, you’ve likely heard that Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia has passed away. May he rest in peace. His legal legacy is a towering one. As such, the impact his death has on the presidential race and future rulings may be even more significant. Apparently the intensity and importance of this election were just getting started.

Many other interesting human things this week. Here are a few:

In a self-driving car, who is responsible for the driving? Perhaps the most important part to be figured out.

It’s always good to listen first–even when you’re right.

Infrastructure is not a sexy political topic, but it’s essential. Made me think of this, too. John Oliver is awesome.

All countries should make a law like this for its unsold food.

Social media is not very kind to teenage girls. Heartbreaking.

“The most satisfying video in the world” is, indeed, extremely satisfying.

This Week in Upgrades: October 31

PhotoMiner/Bigstock.com

Happy Halloween!

Great short video: What makes people happy? :

I personally wouldn’t be mad to see bills and coins disappear. Will Sweden be the first cashless country?

Amazon has already been working with the FAA to fly packages to your home, and now Wal-Mart wants in on drone delivery.

ICYMI: According to the World Health Organization, bacon and other cured meats can probably cause cancer. Let’s take a moment and consider this rationally.

Speaking of things that can be delicious but not great for your health: The changing landscape of fast food.

REI is closing all of its stores during Black Friday and encouraging people to get outside. Brilliant. Will other retailers start doing the same?

Ever put together IKEA furniture? How they design their iconic instruction manuals.

We keep learning more about what stress does to us. How it makes you sick.

This Week in Upgrades: July 25

Little Girl Nature Selfie
De Visu/Bigstock.com

The many-sided fight over building a McDonald’s in Paris’ historic gastronomic neighborhood.

ICYMI: Hackers can now crash cars from thousands of miles away. Over a million susceptible vehicles have been recalled already.

Sony has bought the rights to an emoji movie. Yes, you read that correctly–a feature film about emojis.

James Hansen, original climate change expert, has a terrifying new study, but there’s still hope.

The amount of food Americans waste is hard to comprehend. John Oliver is hilarious and on point, as always.

Over a hundred doctors band together to push for ways cancer drugs can be more affordable.

Please, don’t take selfies with bison. Maybe just don’t take selfies near wild animals at all.

This Week in Upgrades: June 6

Counting Calories
annafrajtova/Bigstock.com

I’m an avid Spotify user, but give up when it comes to classical music. Why are streaming services terrible with some of the best music ever made? NPR

No time to waste. With corrected data, we now know there’s been no slowdown in global warming. NOAA News

Good on IKEA, which consumes 1% of the world’s commercially logged wood, to set aside €1 billion ($1.12 billion) to fight climate change. Grist

Google thinks it can combat obesity by counting the calories in your Instagram food photos. Popular Science

In the battle against cancer, profit still trumps health and well-being. NBC News

For those with kids: are you excited about smart diapers with poo alerts? Fast Company

Your body has a complex rhythm for maintaining energy. Are you undermining it by drinking coffee at the wrong time? Washington Post

The Emperor of All Maladies

Emperor“Hope is a funny thing. You have to base hope on something.” “In medicine, you always want to believe.”

Sometimes the truth is difficult to confront. Who wouldn’t rather reside in a happy place in our minds that makes us feel like everything is going to turn out splendidly than engage uncomfortable or undesirable realities? If only merely putting on a pair of yoga pants suddenly made excess weight and cholesterol dissolve without the sweat, soreness, exhaustion, and discipline of real exercise and healthful diet. If only we could just wish that our lazy, credit-stealing boss was less of a tool and he would become better without having the awkward, status-quo-disrupting conversations to actually make it happen. If only all of our financial, relational, ecological, and other mistakes of human nature would sort themselves out well without any of the ugly, painful consequences. If only we were not mortal creatures and could live forever.

Science and technical innovation are perhaps the most optimistic and hopeful human endeavor of our lifetime, and nowhere has belief and reality collided more than in the area of cancer research and treatment. The quotes at the lead are two of many poignant ones from the excellently crafted recent PBS documentary series Cancer: The Emperor of All Maladies, based on the book of the same name by Siddhartha Mukherjee. Through the all-encompassing history therein, it is apparent that the crucial questions at the core of any discussion about cancer are: What do we really know? What can we now do to address it? We always want to believe that we have the right answers and that we know how things will turn out, but cancer has challenged our understanding of our bodies and our world in ways that few other things have. As Mukherjee states early on in the first part of the series, “to imagine that we will find a simple solution doesn’t do justice to the complexity of the problem.”

Over the course of human history, medical experts of all kinds have run the gamut of nearly every possible explanation for cancer’s causes and viable cures. Is it punishment from the gods? Is it black bile run amok? Is it from a virus, genes, or chemicals? Is there something in the apothecary for it: boar’s tooth, fox’s lung, or crab’s leg? Can’t it just be cut out? Maybe an intravenous combination of some potent synthesized chemicals will wipe it all out? Can’t our immune system do this on its own?

It all is, or at least should be, rather humbling: humbling in both the sense of being humbled—lowered or destroyed—and to be humble—not arrogant, honestly assessing one’s power and understanding. Our bodies are humbled by this debilitating, complex disease that attacks from within: the very constituent parts of our bodies that keep us alive and healthy will under different circumstances kill us. And also, the mysteriousness of cancer and our feeble inability to fully perceive and treat it, despite many and varied efforts of trial and error, should remind us of the limitations of our understanding of the world and our capacity to control it in directions of our own will. Somehow there has been little humility of the latter sort despite the persistence and even increase in cancer’s ravaging humiliation of the former. We always want to believe. We want to believe there’s nothing we can’t understand and course correct it the way we want it to go.

With little or no truthful understanding of cancer’s genetic origins and unpredictable, metastatic spread, we spent decades administering more is better therapies. More cutting: notably the radical mastectomy—barbaric removal of not only a breast with malignancy, but the entire musculature and other tissue below it. More drugs: ever-increasing doses and combinations of chemotherapy—pushing patients closer to the brink of death from treatment than the cancer had itself. One of the most heart-wrenching personal stories shown in the documentary is a young boy who receives aggressive chemotherapy for his leukemia, only to develop a second cancer from the chemo and later die from graft-versus-host after a failed transplant to try to treat the second, medically caused cancer.

Is it better to do something than nothing? What lengths are we willing to go to before we have a better understanding of what’s going on?

Though we now have more accurate concepts like genes, mutations, and pathways rather than humors, we’re not necessarily this close to cancer being fully manageable—as much of the rhetoric of researchers, popular news sources, and some physicians would suggest. After things like smoking, obesity, radiation, viruses, and sunlight, the other 40% of the causes of cancer are not yet known. Prevention and early detection can go a long way, but we’re still seeing through a glass darkly about how the switch is flipped on for a huge set of cancers, and have not found low side-effect treatments that will cleanse and heal the body of the majority of cancers. A few bright spots like the drug Gleevec, a once-a-day pill especially for a form of leukemia, and some immunotherapies—different versions of empowering a body’s own immune system to fight the cancer itself—are exactly that—just a few bright spots in the strive for full cures for all cancers.

Importantly, the documentary spends a meaningful chunk of time near the end exploring the importance of palliative care. It’s difficult to watch as some patients are told there is nothing medical science can do to help them. They will have weeks or maybe months before cancer ends their life. The conversation shifts beyond even a glimmer of hope in this or that treatment to be tried to what is a good death? Eventually, mortality and bodily fragility catch up, and medicine—however advanced and powerful—reaches the limits of its ability to restore. There is no medical expert in eternal life. But doctors still have an important role to play in helping people live out the last days of their lives as well as possible.

As we continue the worthy fight of trying to subvert cancer’s enigmatic power, we need to perpetually ground ourselves in a posture of humility. Too often, medicine (like many other scientific disciplines) has told stories about what cancer is and how it can be defeated that amounted to false hope—acting in overconfidence, and worsening bodily health beyond the destruction of cancer alone. The fight requires ingenuity, patience, a willingness to be dead wrong, collaboration, an emphasis on sustaining the highest level of well-being of patients, honesty, and a tempered optimism, rather than buoyant expectation, that perhaps one day we just might get it all figured out. It’s not a given, though. It’s not inevitable, it won’t happen overnight, and it won’t be without setbacks. Hope has to be based on something. The way to that something—to truth—requires a humble approach. The limits of: what we know, what we don’t, and what we’re willing to subject people to. Our power to investigate, learn, and understand is as personal and finite as our vulnerable bodies.