How to Adult: Holidays

Los Angeles has, at most, two seasons. There’s a sunny and hot one, and a sunny and slightly cooler one. There are very few days with rain. Few days that are even overcast from morning to night. On most days out of the year, it could be any month if you weren’t looking at the calendar.

This was quite an adjustment for me. I spent nearly 25 years growing up in Wisconsin where there are four clearly defined seasons. You can watch and feel the transitions from one to the next. The summer thunderstorms. The colorful fall leaves. The first flakes of snow. The plants climbing out of the spring dirt.

These natural beats mark time throughout the year. They give you a sense of the change as time passes. Yet also a sense of rhythm and familiarity as many of the same beats happen from one year to the next. The more true seasons and seasonal signifiers, the more connected to time we feel.

We, humans, have added to nature our own markers through the year: holidays. In the United States as recently as the 1830s, there were only Independence Day, Thanksgiving, New Year’s, and Christmas. Since then, we’ve expanded to days like Halloween, Valentine’s Day, Mother’s Day, Father’s Day, and Labor Day. And there are several more informal holidays like Super Bowl Sunday, Black Friday, and national food days for everything from Baked Alaska to leg of lamb.

Holidays give us more beats to mark time through the year. And unlike seasons, we control what holidays are and what they entail because we constructed them. Being relatively older, Thanksgiving and Christmas have particularly deep roots. If you celebrate one or both of them in your family, you’re likely to have a whole host of traditions, favorite things, and memories associated.

The foods you eat, the decorations you put up, the things you watch together, the gifts you give and how you give them, the religious rites you partake in, and more. It can go from the super specific to the broad and ineffable: from the dish that grandma works all day to make and serves at 4pm to an intangible feeling of love and warmth.

Holidays give us rhythm like seasons. You might not circle National Leg of Lamb Day on the calendar, but you undoubtedly look forward to holidays with more depth and memory–Thanksgiving, Hanukkah, Christmas, and New Year’s. They are moments and spaces in time we come back to year after year so that we can remind ourselves of who we are and what we care about. In places like the endless sunshine of Southern California, or in the distracting bustle of work, school, errands, and bills we can lose track of the passage of time, and with it our self-identity.

Holidays are pockets throughout the year that, no matter what is happening or will happen, we stop and come together with the people we care about. For at least that day, we’re making life happen instead of life happening to us. We have ways of honoring and relishing that day with others.

So as we move into Thanksgiving week and the rest of the major holiday season, spend some time reflecting on and enjoying the traditions, the favorite things, and the memories. And make some new ones!

The heaviness of the election still weighs on many. Amongst family and friends, there are starkly different political views. It happens. We should absolutely talk about those things together when it’s the right time–openly, patiently, respectfully, constructively. But before you go on a rant about who won and why the world is either saved or ending, reach out for a hug, tell them you’re thankful they’re there, and peel some vegetables for the casserole. Put on the movie or the game you all snuggle up and watch together. Reminisce about the travel obstacles you overcame in years past to be together. Grieve the emptiness left by family and friends who are no longer around to celebrate.

Time passes unceasingly. Seasons, holidays, freezing and thawing, growth and death. We never know how much time we have, but at least we have today. And once in awhile today has added layers because we’ve designated it a holiday.

Stop and take notice. Give thanks for the people around you. Embrace. Remember. Make life happen.

May you find rhythm, togetherness, and identity through the march of time.

This Week in Upgrades: June 20

Hello, friend. Are you enduring a heat wave? 2016 is well on its way to being the hottest year on record, and the 108° forecasted high for today where I live is definitely confirming that. Stay cool, stay safe, stay woke.

So many great Upgrades this week. At least we have that going for us.

Ever wonder how big the universe is? We seem to have figured it out.

NASA is looking for explorers for Mars, and they’ve made some sweet posters for the campaign.

In other NASA news, they’re developing an all-electric plane–possibly paving the way for a cleaner era of air travel.

Similarly, Harley-Davidson is apparently going to launch an all-electric motorcycle in the next few years. Nice.

These are 2016’s 50 best restaurants in the world. Congrats to Massimo Bottura on #1. His Chef’s Table episode is delightful.

Speaking of restaurants: for the first time, Americans are spending more eating out than on groceries for home.

Do you know how far your food traveled?

The latest in a long line of studies suggests coffee does not cause cancer. This coffee-drinker is relieved (until the next study comes out).

Popular foods renamed as their calorie count will probably make you think twice about eating them.

What makes for great dialogue in a film?

If you want to be a good boss, choose philosophy over a business degree.

What will self-driving trucks do to the trucking industry? Another reason young Americans are giving up on modern capitalism, and why we need a new American Dream.

A reminder that self-driving public transportation will also soon change the way people and goods travel.

Snapchat is launching an online magazine about device culture. Interested to see how this turns out.

Emojis are becoming crucial for text message communication.

Have a fantastic week! 🎉