How to Be Outside

In 2014, a United Nations study revealed that for the first time more people live in cities than in the country. Humans have officially become an urban creature, with an increasing number living near city centers every day. Many of us are more familiar with sirens, subways, and smog than the deep woods, open plains, or desert.

Like anyone anywhere else, city-dwellers acclimate to their surroundings. The pace of life, the smells, the organization and interrelationship of streets and buildings, the sounds, the dialect, the level of optimism, and the rest. Much of it becomes so ingrained and habitual that it’s unconscious. This is the way things are. This is the way the world works. But the gradual fading of awareness to surroundings does not mean they don’t have a significant impact.

We’re only beginning to understand what things like traffic, pollution, and frenetic days of production and consumption do to us biologically. Sometimes, we’ll get a clear signal from our bodies that we need more rest, less stimulation, cleaner air, less noise, or other conditions that will allow us to return to homeostasis. We know that somewhere out there–5 miles or 500 miles–we could be in greener and freer places. In a bit of fresh air that might clear our minds and blow away the accumulation of stress and urban artifice. Not everyone is an outdoors person or longs to get away from the city. But the woods and plains and desert represent a kind of Eden that we could return to and find rejuvenation if we wanted.

The trouble is a lot of us don’t know how to be outside. Even if we choose to go there. The city clings onto us as we venture miles away, with smartphones acting as a tether and transporter no matter how far we travel. The forces of the city that have shaped urbanites often causes them to–at least initially–continue to act like they’re in the city when they’re in the midst of the outdoors. Anxious activity and reactivity, big speakers and constant out-loud commentary, and an expectation for comforting amenities of every kind. It overruns cabins, campsites, and hiking trails.

Unless you consciously try to let the outdoors act on you instead of you acting on it, there’s a good chance that most of the reason to get outside will be lost. You can even ruin the outdoors itself in the process. A littered plastic bottle in a random bush along a trail seems much more out of place than one on the sidewalk on Main St. We know in our bones that the outdoors is relatively pristine and elemental (without trash here and there), which should be a reminder that its benefits are available to us if we’re able to get out of our own way.

Even a short time in a natural setting can be incredibly invigorating and restorative. Better mood. Clearer vision. Easier breathing. Lower cortisol and overall stress. A more open and focused mind. A natural high (aerosols from forests of evergreens act as a mild sedative).

So let the outdoors tell you how to be there and do to you as it will. Do what you can to leave things as they are, rather than bringing in all kinds of gear and imposition. Let the outdoors make the sounds instead of your voice and streaming music, and let your ears tune into what’s there. Let your eyes relax and adjust so they can see things in ways other than what the pixelated light of a smartphone presents. And try to learn to be OK with the unexpected (while making sure you’re safe, obviously). An outdoor environment will present you with a whole variety of things you didn’t see coming, and it’s good to be reminded that we’re not always in control and able to predict what happens next. Something near a campsite or just around the corner of the trail may uplift you and stick with you for a long time.

It can be awkward and a little unsettling to be outside if you’re not doing it often. And it’s natural to carry with us what we’re used to–needing time and reminders to break out of it. Knowing that it’s restorative and rewarding to be outdoors, we can all learn how to do it a little better for the benefit of ourselves and the places we visit.

This Week in Upgrades: February 13

Hi! Happy Monday to you. I took a bit of a break last week, so I apologize if you were waiting for a weekly assortment of interesting things you may have missed. Obviously, that never happened. Sad face emoji.

Breaks and balance and rest are vital. I took my opportunity when I had it. I thrive on staying informed and browsing through all sorts of commentary about what’s going on in the world. But over the last couple weeks, I found myself mostly just getting frustrated at everything little dumb thing. I had to give my brain and emotions some time to recuperate. Have you ever been there? What do you like to do to feel like yourself again?

A recent study suggested that if you’re not getting good sleep you should go camping. Need to get back out in the woods soon.

Here’s what else caught my attention this week…

Do you like spicy food? How do you feel about a “heatless” habanero?

A number of teenage girls are experiencing major depression, with some saying they “get their ‘entire identity’ from their phone…constantly checking the number of ‘tags, likes, Instagram photos and Snapchat stories.'” Yikes.

It’s not just teenage girls. A majority of people will have at least one mental health struggle in their lifetime. What are we doing to support mental well-being?

Thank you, Kids Try…, for making me laugh out loud even in dark times.

The most remote place on Earth, the Mariana Trench, has an “extraordinary” amount of pollution. Humans literally impact every inch of the planet.

Here’s a remarkable look at the unpolluted ocean we should be protecting.

A reminder that much more automation is coming, so we better get ready.

Will this Chrome extension help get us out of our ideological bubbles?

A few books I’ve read recently that I definitely recommend: The Nordic Theory of EverythingInfinite DistractionThe Earth and I

Have a great week!

 

 

This Week In Upgrades: August 22

Hello, hello! Have you been missing awesome links on Mondays? I’ve sure missed sharing them. What a whirlwind of weeks. Made it through and feeling good now.

Can you believe we’re into the last days of August already? Man, is this year going by quickly. Let’s slow things down by taking stock of some worthwhile things on the web from this week.

The trailer for the feature-length version of Voyage of Time, narrated by Cate Blanchett, was released. Can’t tell you how excited I am to see both versions of this.

Fungi may wipe out all of our bananas. Monoculture is not good, you guys.

Werner Herzog’s documentary on the Internet, Lo and Behold, came out on Friday. Have you seen it?

July was likely the hottest month in human history. Like, at any point human beings have been on this planet. This, along with the insane fires and flooding, would suggest we’re officially in the first summer of climate change. The village of Shishmaref became the first US community to decide to relocate because of rising seas. They won’t be the last.

Seen CRISPR in the news? Gene editing will soon change our bodies and the future of humanity. Here’s a great explainer video.

Workplace suicides are increasing worldwide over the last 30 years. An incredibly tragic consequence of neoliberalism. What can we do about this?

The US Justice Department announced it is phasing out the use of private prisons. About time.

Ford is promising a mass-produced self-driving car by 2021. Uber is launching semi-autonomous Ford Fusions in Pittsburg in a few weeks.

If you love Parmesan cheese, you need to read this. Make sure you’re getting the real, good stuff!

The first few weeks of college can be the most dangerous. Some tips for freshmen and their parents to get through safe and sound.

Have you been hoping for “a FitBit for your brain?” I suppose it’s the logical continuation of the quantified self, but I’m not sure about this.

These images are not exactly what the naked eye sees, but light pollution is a serious problem. Artificially shining out all that night sky splendor.

The Navajo Nation has sued the EPA over the San Juan River mine spill. “Spring, which once symbolized the bringing of new life as many Navajo families planted their crops, now represents a looming threat as Spring runoff instead brings toxic metals to Navajo water and lands.”

You’ve never heard Beethoven like this. Crazy skills.

Have an excellent week!

This Week in Upgrades: July 5

A very pleasant Tuesday to you. Still have fireworks exploding around you? Our neighborhood was plenty raucous. I hope you had a safe and enjoyable holiday weekend.

If you weren’t celebrating July 4th, maybe you celebrated NASA successfully placing Juno in orbit with Jupiter? Can’t wait until we start getting images and data back.

Lots of other interesting and important things this week. Like…

Don’t go crazy with it, but we don’t need to demonize butter anymore.

We get new cells all the time. So how old is your body, really?

Will this legislation help save the bees?

We now know how dogs sniff out diabetes. Definitely humankind’s best friend.

Bluefin tuna will probably be fished to extinction if we don’t do more to protect them.

Researchers believe air pollution is responsible for 6.5 million deaths per year.

Speaking of manmade environmental change, it looks like we’ve passed a crucial threshold. This is not good.

It would help if the American government actually addressed the dire state of the climate. The Democratic Party platform wasn’t particularly aspirational.

An important essay on how slavery was fundamental to modern economics.

More than anything, a universal basic income would mean the end of BS jobs. All part of that new American Dream.

Terrence Malick’s Voyage of Time looks stunning. Sometimes we lose perspective on how astounding it is that we’re here now in the midst of all this.

This Week in Upgrades: June 13

Good day to you. How’s your Monday so far? I think many people here in the US are still processing what happened in Orlando yesterday, and the broader incomprehensibleness of gun violence in America. I had some thoughts on that in this morning’s Who Needs a Gun? So much to reflect about and change.

Other noteworthy things filled up the Internet this week before Orlando happened. Some of the best of humanity, some of the worst. Let’s all aspire to a more enlightened consciousness.

In some places, McDonald’s is the most important social space. McDonald’s, you say? Humans will always blow up clean categories and preconceptions.

Why do so many people love stormy weather?

Batman: The Animated Series was such a great piece of art.

What kind of choice is Trump’s racism or Clinton’s racism?

Arctic sea ice hit a shocking new low. Whoa.

Most Americans can no longer see the Milky Way because of light pollution. This makes me really sad.

Protecting Navajo identity from brand appropriation. When have Native Americans not been screwed over?

Norway will go carbon-neutral by 2030. Killing it with sustainability.

Have a wonderful week!

 

 

This Week in Upgrades: March 21

Happy spring! Southern California has essentially one season, but maybe it’s actually spring where you live. I was able to walk out the door in a fleece this morning so I’m happy with that.

All kinds of interesting and important things in the last week. Things like:

A news site is posting in Lakota to try to preserve the language.

Nautilus wonders why wheelchairs are more stigmatized than glasses. “Disability is partly a medical identity, and partly a political identity.”

Domino’s is testing a pizza delivery robot. Automation creeps in a little more each day.

This presidential election has been nearly impossible to explain. Maybe it all comes down to a wedding?

ICYMI: SeaWorld will no longer breed orcas in captivity.

America is undergoing its first major population dislocation due to climate change.

The news in your own country feels like the most important stuff in the whole world. But what is the rest of the world paying attention to?

Self-driving cars will change the nature of intersections (for the better).

It’s not great to drink your protein. We all need to ease up a bit on the meal replacement thing.

How do you stop Internet trolling?

A celebration of leftovers. Yes!

Have a fantastic week!

 

This Week in Upgrades: Feb 15

Happy Monday, and a good Presidents Day to you! Are you off of work? I hope you enjoy it, if so. It may be the weirdest holiday, but it gives a lot of people a three-day weekend–so there’s that.

I’m turning 31 this week, which is difficult to believe. Honestly, the numbers stopped making sense around 25. When you’re old like me, you start to get a bit paranoid about anything out of the ordinary with your health. Fortunately, tips like these are a good way to combat the worry. I’m truly grateful to be alive, and I plan to be around for a long time.

It’s been an incredibly historic week. Gravitational waves, proposed by Einstein, were proven. This will begin an exciting new era of science–possibly even leading to time travel!

In other exciting science news, researchers are hailing unprecedented results in clinical trials using the body’s own t-cells for cancer treatment. If these initial findings are any indication, we’re at an important crossroad in outsmarting cancer.

By now, you’ve likely heard that Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia has passed away. May he rest in peace. His legal legacy is a towering one. As such, the impact his death has on the presidential race and future rulings may be even more significant. Apparently the intensity and importance of this election were just getting started.

Many other interesting human things this week. Here are a few:

In a self-driving car, who is responsible for the driving? Perhaps the most important part to be figured out.

It’s always good to listen first–even when you’re right.

Infrastructure is not a sexy political topic, but it’s essential. Made me think of this, too. John Oliver is awesome.

All countries should make a law like this for its unsold food.

Social media is not very kind to teenage girls. Heartbreaking.

“The most satisfying video in the world” is, indeed, extremely satisfying.

This Week in Upgrades: January 4

Hope you had an excellent New Year celebration! Here are some of the most significant human things from the last week.

 

How many trees are there in the world?

 

Toxic relationship habits many people think are normal.

 

How Donald Trump’s conversation style works.

 

You know about the natural disaster in California, right?

 

Defiance is sometimes exactly what’s needed.

 

Microbeads–the tiny spheres in your health products–will soon be a thing of the past.

 

The In Defense of Food documentary is steaming online for a limited time. Michael Pollan is great.

 

Netflix’s Making a Murderer is a devastating piece of documentary filmmaking. Have you seen it? “How do we as a society respond when injustice is exposed?

 

This Week in Upgrades: June 27

Brain Faceted
eranicle/Bigstock.com

John Oliver on the absurdity of Internet trolling. Heartfelt and hilarious as usual. Vox

Just another reason to clean up the skies: air pollution is making your brain age faster. New York Times

A safer highway: Samsung develops a see-through truck by putting screens on the outside. Mashable

Pixar’s Inside Out brilliantly challenges our cultural dogma that we should all be happy all of the time. Indiewire

There are now more Americans who are obese than there are who are simply overweight. We’re better than this. LA Times

“If you make a typo or regret sending a message…” In case you missed it, Google’s Undo Send option for email went live this week. Google

Hawaii became the first state to change the smoking age to 21, and it’s not only because of cigarettes. The Verge

Disney has banned selfie sticks at all of its parks. BuzzFeed News

The Back to the Future 2 hoverboard dream will not die, and Lexus may have developed a functional prototype. Could we actually get one in 2015? Engadget

This Oglala Lakota chef is reviving traditional Native American cuisine, and it sounds delicious (and healthy!) “There should be Native American restaurants all over the nation that really show how diverse the United States is in culture and cuisine.” Grist